Sharpe's Honour (1994)

Film details

Synopsis

Sharpe unwittingly becomes a pawn in the French's game to make a treaty with the Spaniards and drive out the English, and for Ducos to have his revenge on Sharpe. Napoleon's intelligence man Ducos orders the beautiful spy known as La Marquesa to write a letter to her Spanish nobleman husband accusing Sharpe of raping her. A duel between the nobleman and Sharpe is prevented, but after the nobleman is murdered in his sleep (by the Inquisitor Father Hacha and his brother) Sharpe is accused of the murder. He is court-martialled and found guilty - being stripped of his rank and sentenced to hang. However, Nairn and Wellington are suspicious and replace Sharpe with another condemned man. Sharpe and Harper are sent behind enemy lines to find La Marquesa, who may have valuable information and also be able to clear Sharpe. She has been kidnapped by Father Hacha, after her wealth, and is locked in a convent. Sharpe meets up with the partisans led by Hacha's brother, El Matarife, pretending to have been sent by Wellington to ask for his help. Sharpe sneaks up to the convent and there rescues La Marquesa. They are later captured by the French, although Harper escapes and gets back to camp to find that Ramona has given birth to his son and to organise the Chosen Men in a rescue party. Sharpe is tortured by Ducos, who reveals the French's plan, when the rescue party arrive. Ducos escapes and murders Father Hacha and Sharpe again encounters El Matarife, winning in a one-to-one combat with him and forcing him to confess out loud to being a spy for the French and murdering the Spanish nobleman. Sharpe is then exonerted and reinstated as an officer.

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