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  • From the Magazine

    Burning illusions: the long road to black British film stardom

    Black actors have been a presence in British films since the early years of cinema, but a depressing lack of opportunities has forced the vast majority to rely on the small screen to help ends meet or to cross the Atlantic in search of real fame and creative fulfilment, writes Ashley Clark.

    Ashley Clark
    Wednesday 14 December 2016

    Features

  • Bigger than Texas: Giant at 60

    George Stevens’s Texan epic is as weird as it is ambitious. On its 60th anniversary, Peter Tonguette takes a look at how this painterly film prepared the canvas for America’s 1970s new wave.

    Peter Tonguette
    Tuesday 13 December 2016

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    A monumental reckoning: how Abel Gance’s Napoleon was restored to full glory

    The production history of the extraordinary 1927 film – and of the painstaking, decades-long efforts to reconstruct the film from surviving prints – displays some of the fearless single-mindedness and megalomaniac ambition of the emperor himself. By Paul Cuff.

    Paul Cuff
    Friday 18 November 2016

    Features

  • The (few) women breaking through in Korean cinema

    Women are unusually well-represented on screen in Korean cinema. Behind the camera is a different story – for reasons that say more about our own biases than we might care to recognise, reports Darcy Paquet.

    Darcy Paquet
    Friday 11 November 2016

    Features

  • Light of day: Raoul Coutard on shooting film for Jean-Luc Godard

    In tribute to the great French New Wave cinematographer Raoul Coutard, who has died aged 92, we republish this 1965 reminiscence about how he learnt to ‘keep it simple’, Godard-style.

    Raoul Coutard
    Wednesday 9 November 2016

    Features

  • Cinephilia down the ages: a Museum of the Everyday

    An exhibition devoted to obsessive and quirky records of cinemagoing reveals how film fandom, and geekery, have transformed over the past century, finds Pamela Hutchinson.

    Pamela Hutchinson
    Tuesday 8 November 2016

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    How the French birthed film noir

    Harder, deeper, darker: Ginette Vincendeau on how the French fused urban realism, underclass romance and shadow politics to produce some of the cinema’s keynote fatal fantasies.

    Ginette Vincendeau
    Friday 4 November 2016

    Deep Focus

  • Why is it so hard to see East Asian films in UK cinemas?

    A few years back, East Asian cinema experienced a boom in popularity, but these days, most titles find it difficult to get even a small release in the UK. Can audiences learn to embrace Eastern cinema once again, asks Anton Bitel?

    Anton Bitel
    Monday 31 October 2016

    Features

  • Hex appeal: how witches charmed the cinema

    Witches are not just for Halloween, or for horror movies. Charlotte Richardson Andrews celebrates the screen’s sexier, more sisterly sorceresses: symbols of divine feminine magic and healing rather than bloodthirsty she-devils. With video by Leigh Singer.

    Charlotte Richardson Andrews, Leigh Singer
    Friday 28 October 2016

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    Ingrid Bergman’s early years

    Ingrid Bergman was always first and foremost an actor rather than a star, and her formative years on screen in Sweden, and later Germany, shaped the remarkable talent that would soon make her a Hollywood legend, says Pamela Hutchinson.

    Pamela Hutchinson
    Tuesday 18 October 2016

    Features

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