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  • From the Magazine

    The Crown: Peter Morgan’s majestic Windsor saga

    Peter Morgan has long been fêted for his remarkable ability to animate the personal conflicts that lie behind great historical events, but now he has finally been given a canvas commensurate with his true talents, in the ten-part Netflix series The Crown, which charts Elizabeth II’s early years. He talks to Trevor Johnston.

    Trevor Johnston
    Thursday 6 April 2017

    Features

  • The internationalism of P.K. Nair, the celluloid man

    The great film preservationist saved thousands of films, not just for India but for the whole world. Shruti Narayanswamy and Tim Concannon one of his final interviews, his mission was to save everything, keep everything and screen everything, write Shruti Narayanswamy and Tim Concannon.

    Shruti Narayanswamy, Tim Concannon
    Tuesday 21 March 2017

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    A world beyond Bollywood: surveying the new Indian cinema

    The extraordinary richness and diversity of India’s movies, not least from its booming independent sector, is the secret to their success, says Meenakshi Shedde.

    Meenakshi Shedde
    Tuesday 21 March 2017

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    Hooray for Jeni LeGon: the Hollywood pioneer who “danced like a boy”

    Hollywood’s ingrained racism deprived Jeni LeGon of a great dance career – an emblematic injustice that’s both recounted and countered in Zadie Smith’s brilliant new novel Swing Time, writes Pamela Hutchinson.

    Pamela Hutchinson
    Wednesday 8 March 2017

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    Patience (After Sebald): under the sign of Saturn

    Grant Gee’s film Patience (After Sebald) and a recent symposium inspire Mark Fisher to revisit The Rings of Saturn, the Suffolk odyssey of German-born writer W.G. Sebald.

    Mark Fisher
    Tuesday 24 January 2017

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    Burning illusions: the long road to black British film stardom

    Black actors have been a presence in British films since the early years of cinema, but a depressing lack of opportunities has forced the vast majority to rely on the small screen to help ends meet or to cross the Atlantic in search of real fame and creative fulfilment, writes Ashley Clark.

    Ashley Clark
    Wednesday 14 December 2016

    Features

  • Bigger than Texas: Giant at 60

    George Stevens’s Texan epic is as weird as it is ambitious. On its 60th anniversary, Peter Tonguette takes a look at how this painterly film prepared the canvas for America’s 1970s new wave.

    Peter Tonguette
    Tuesday 13 December 2016

    Features

  • From the Magazine

    A monumental reckoning: how Abel Gance’s Napoleon was restored to full glory

    The production history of the extraordinary 1927 film – and of the painstaking, decades-long efforts to reconstruct the film from surviving prints – displays some of the fearless single-mindedness and megalomaniac ambition of the emperor himself. By Paul Cuff.

    Paul Cuff
    Friday 18 November 2016

    Features

  • The (few) women breaking through in Korean cinema

    Women are unusually well-represented on screen in Korean cinema. Behind the camera is a different story – for reasons that say more about our own biases than we might care to recognise, reports Darcy Paquet.

    Darcy Paquet
    Friday 11 November 2016

    Features

  • Light of day: Raoul Coutard on shooting film for Jean-Luc Godard

    In tribute to the great French New Wave cinematographer Raoul Coutard, who has died aged 92, we republish this 1965 reminiscence about how he learnt to ‘keep it simple’, Godard-style.

    Raoul Coutard
    Wednesday 9 November 2016

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