All From the Sight & Sound archive articles

From the Sight & Sound archive

Satire with tweezers: Alexander Mackendrick’s The Ladykillers

In this piece from our July 2004 issue, Philip Kemp revisits Ealing Studios’ classic 1955 comedy The Ladykillers, and finds in it a wickedly satirical satire about an England in terminal decline.

By Philip Kemp

Satire with tweezers: Alexander Mackendrick’s The Ladykillers
From the Sight & Sound archive

Love to death: Hitchcock, Du Maurier and Rebecca

By Alison Light

Love to death: Hitchcock, Du Maurier and Rebecca
From the Sight & Sound archive

Colonial guilt: India Song and Marguerite Duras

By Carlos Clarens

Colonial guilt: India Song and Marguerite Duras
From the Sight & Sound archive

Notes from the cinematographer: Léonce-Henry Burel on working with Robert Bresson

By Tom Milne

Notes from the cinematographer: Léonce-Henry Burel on working with Robert Bresson
From the Sight & Sound archive

Erich Von Stroheim in London

By Karel Reisz

Erich Von Stroheim in London
From the Sight & Sound archive

Kenneth Tynan on Greta Garbo: “The ecstasy of existing”

By Kenneth Tynan

Kenneth Tynan on Greta Garbo: “The ecstasy of existing”
From the Sight & Sound archive

Mothers, lovers and others: films by Black British female directors

By Karen Alexander

Mothers, lovers and others: films by Black British female directors
From the Sight & Sound archive

A rage in Harlesden: Stuart Hall on Babymother, Britain’s first dancehall drama

By Stuart Hall

A rage in Harlesden: Stuart Hall on Babymother, Britain’s first dancehall drama
From the Sight & Sound archive

Alfred Hitchcock: my own methods

By Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock: my own methods
From the Sight & Sound archive

White noise: Carol Clover on Joel Schumacher’s Falling Down

By Carol Clover

White noise: Carol Clover on Joel Schumacher’s Falling Down
From the Sight & Sound archive

Sorrowful black death is not a hot ticket: bell hooks on Spike Lee’s Crooklyn

By Bell Hooks

Sorrowful black death is not a hot ticket: bell hooks on Spike Lee’s Crooklyn