Phan Dang-Di

Bi; Don't Be Afraid

Vietnam

Voted in the directors’ poll

Voted for

1963

Federico Fellini

Apocalypse Now

1979

Francis Ford Coppola

Breathless

1960

Jean-Luc Godard

Clockwork Orange, A

1971

Stanley Kubrick

I am Cuba

1964

Mikhail Kalatozov

Pather Panchali

1955

Satyajit Ray

Rashomon

1950

Akira Kurosawa

Time to Live and a Time To Die, A

1985

Hsiao-hsien Hou

Tin Drum, The

1979

Volker Schlöndorff

Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives

2010

Apichatpong Weerasethakul

Comments

Pather Panchali: Of all the films that I’ve ever seen, none can describe as deeply about the sacredness of human’s life as this beautiful and simple film does.

8½: With this masterpiece, Fellini showed how far a filmmaker can go in describing a human’s complicated thoughts, not through narration but via rich, accurate and beautiful cinema language.

Through Rashomon, Akira Kurosawa not only showed us the relativeness of the definition of truth in human life but also told us that absolute cinematic beauty can be created by the simplest materials.

I Am Cuba: This huge and bold work contains all the strengths of mise-en-scene techniques and shows amazing mastery of the cinematography techniques of Russian cinema.

Breathless: The daring renovation of mise-en-scene, editing and story telling of this film created a new grammar in cinema language which is still up-to-date and is used by a lot of current directors.

Apocalypse Now: The most spectacular war movie of all time where the director fought with God in creating a world which is both illusory and real, a world of blood, weapons and death which has not been seen like before or since.

A Clockwork Orange: Never have the two biggest cinema themes, which are violence and sex, been expressed as obsessively as in this strange film.

A Time to Live and a Time to Die: This film reached a simple but echoed status of Zen. It’s also the best film with a family theme that I have ever seen.

The Tin Drum: Almost all films which adapted from famous literary works fail but this is a surprising exception. It deserves to be called the most successful adapted film of all time.

Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives: If movies can suggest a way of liberation to reach a realisation status, this film did it.

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