David Rudkin

Dramatist, screenwriter

UK

Voted in the critics’ poll

Voted for

Battleship Potemkin

1925

Sergei M Eisenstein

Citizen Kane

1941

Orson Welles

Day of Wrath

1943

Carl Theodor Dreyer

Ikiru

1952

Akira Kurosawa

Intolerance

1916

D.W. Griffith

Napoleon

1927

Abel Gance

Partie de campagne

1936

Jean Renoir

Passion of Joan of Arc

1927

Carl Theodor Dreyer

Vampyr

1932

Carl Theodor Dreyer

Vertigo

1958

Alfred Hitchcock

Comments

Intolerance is liberation of the camera as narrative instrument. Napoleon is the extreme application of Griffith’s discovery. Battleshp Potemkin is the definition of visual-geometrical rhythm as expressive instrument. In The Passion of Joan of Arc, the physical landscape of the human face and context become the metaphysical made visible. Vampyr is an inverse vision of that. A Day in the Country is the diametric opposite of all my other choices: ‘natural’ cinema, with its technique invisible, subsumed into pure lyricism. Citizen Kane – well… just the individual audacity of it, and craft to bring it off. Day of Wrath has a consummate classically ordered narrative, and uses lighting and camera as moral instruments. Ikuru/Living – the title says it all. Vertigo is the pinnacle example of film as ‘industry’, mediating (without knowing) a unique transgressive vision. They’re the ones I’d vote to keep if we had to destroy the rest.

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