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  • Always for pleasure: the adventures of Bill and Turner Ross

    Two prodigies of American documentary’s digital revolution, the Ross brothers beckon you aboard their wagon. Robert Greene is on already.
    Wednesday 22 June 2016

  • Film of the week: Cemetery of Splendour

    Things to do in Thailand when you’re in purgatory: Apichatpong Weerasethakul’s latest takes the pulse of a sleep-sick nation, says Tony Rayns.
    Friday 17 June 2016

  • Perchance to dream: a long night with Apichatpong’s shorts

    Giovanni Marchini reports on a marathon all-night reverie with Apichatpong ‘Joe’ Weerasethakul’s filmic lullabies – five of his features and 29 of his shorts – and wonders, as dawn broke and the films grew darker, if Joe has lost his joy?
    Friday 17 June 2016

  • A love letter to Carol White

    Catharine Des Forges remembers a Ken Loach romantic heroine and a genuine working-class 1960s British movie star, half a century after their quartet of classics that culminated in Poor Cow.
    Friday 17 June 2016

  • Closer: Sundance London 2016

    After three years in the hinterlands and a year off to take stock, the premiere US indie showcase finally popped up in the heart of the capital with a hit-and-miss taster programme of premieres and talks. So what kind of outreach is this, asks Simran Hans?
    Thursday 16 June 2016

  • Film of the week: Fire at Sea

    The lives of others: nonfiction master Gianfranco Rosi depicts daily life and unconscionable tragedy back to back on the Mediterranean frontier island of Lampedusa – and asks us how to connect them, says Trevor Johnston.
    Friday 10 June 2016

  • Warland of hypnosis and knowledge: Ukraine in the mirror

    “Divided in mind” as well as in identity, Ukrainians get to see themselves on screen at their DocuDays film festival, which has valiantly nurtured a media-savvy audience over the past 14 years. This year, of course, provided plenty to open eyes and minds, reports Eero Tammi.
    Monday 20 June 2016

  • Look back in wonder: FLARE 2016 critics’ roundtable

    On its thirtieth anniversary, the erstwhile London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival had plenty to reflect on, from biopics and revionist histories and rereleases to the new places queer cinema is going. Claire Kurylowski, Sophie Mayer and Ben Walters share notes in this podcast.
    Monday 20 June 2016

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  • Sight & Sound: the July 2016 issue

    Sight & Sound: the July 2016 issue

    Cannes 2016 special: the inside track on new films from Loach, Arnold, Jarmusch, Verhoeven, Almodóvar, Ade, Assayas, the Dardennes, Mungiu and more. Plus fashion horror The Neon Demon, Olivia de Havilland, Studio Ghibli’s final inhouse movie, Embrace of the Serpent and the Shane Black buddy movie.

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More recent stories from Sight & Sound

  • The rise of female documentary makers in Mexico

    The rise of female documentary makers in Mexico

    Mexico may not be the easiest country in which to be a woman, and its cinema’s pecking order is as macho as most. But at this year’s Ambulante documentary festival, six female-directed finds show the country’s subordinate sex finding its voice, reports Neil Young.


    Friday 10 June 2016

    Festivals

  • The new guard: an interview with the new heads of Sheffield Doc/Fest

    The new guard: an interview with the new heads of Sheffield Doc/Fest

    With a new leadership team in place, can the UK’s top showcase for nonfiction film replenish itself, asks Nick Bradshaw?


    Friday 10 June 2016

    Festivals

  • Lancing corruption in Line of Duty and Undercover

    Lancing corruption in Line of Duty and Undercover

    Two recent BBC hit series mine real-life institutional crookedness for drama, better or worse – but they’d be more truly gripping if they didn’t fence us off from it, argues Gaylene Gould.


    Friday 3 June 2016

    TV

  • Film of the week: The Measure of a Man

    Film of the week: The Measure of a Man

    Mal travail: the great Vincent Lindon bears the degradations of life as a capitalist cog in his third collaboration with France’s flourishing social realist Stéphane Brizé, writes Ginette Vincendeau.


    Thursday 2 June 2016

    Reviews and recommendations

  • Carla Lane, 1928–2016

    Carla Lane, 1928–2016

    Liverpool’s great sitcom tragi-comedist, co-writer of The Liver Birds, Bread and Butterflies, has died at the age of 87, writes Lisa Kerrigan.


    Wednesday 1 June 2016

    Obituaries

  • Film of the week: Love & Friendship

    Film of the week: Love & Friendship

    Schemes and schemata: Kate Beckinsale makes an indelible drawing-room puppet mistress in Whit Stillman’s excellently acerbic adaptation of Jane Austen’s Lady Susan, says Thirza Wakefield.


    Thursday 26 May 2016

    Reviews and recommendations

  • Behind the scenes of Love & Friendship

    Behind the scenes of Love & Friendship

    A six-minute look at the cast and characters of Whit Stillman’s wonderfully catty Jane Austen adaptation, by Whit Stillman.


    Friday 27 May 2016

    Video

  • Donald Trump, reality chimera

    Donald Trump, reality chimera

    In the land of Reagan, right-thinking types are shocked – shocked – at the rise of a prime-time blowhard and professional bully. Yet isn’t it our media naivety that’s on show here, asks Robert Greene?


    Thursday 26 May 2016

    Unfiction

  • Come show off with us: Flatpack’s ten years of public spaces and spirits

    Come show off with us: Flatpack’s ten years of public spaces and spirits

    Birmingham’s peerlessly eclectic Flatpack Film Festival marked its first decade with more of the regional and communal celebration that makes it special. Thirza Wakefield rounds up three rum portraits of 1970s community-art action, 80s Nottingham breakdancing and 1990 video stars in Blyth.


    Friday 27 May 2016

    Festivals

  • Outside in: creative cinematic documentary comes to the UK

    Outside in: creative cinematic documentary comes to the UK

    Taking inspiration from founts of nonfiction heterodoxy like CPH:DOX and True/False, the ICA’s Frames of Representation festival found a ready audience for its inaugural eight-film showcase of documentary ‘new visions’ from less beaten corners of the world, reports Ben Nicholson.


    Friday 27 May 2016

    Festivals

  • Making ground: remembering Kathleen Collins

    Making ground: remembering Kathleen Collins

    As the reputation of Kathleen Collins’ enrapturing, semi-autobiographical Losing Ground finally grows, nearly 35 years after its release, Ashley Clark pays tribute to its late maker and her all-too-brief career.


    Monday 23 May 2016

    Features

  • Cannes 2016: the Posters d’Or

    Cannes 2016: the Posters d’Or

    For our second annual showcase of the festival’s best posters, we picked two winners – from a wonderfully rich field. Is a festival the best place to see the uncompromised art of the film poster, asks Isabel Stevens?


    Sunday 22 May 2016

    The pictures

  • Film of the week: Heart of a Dog

    Film of the week: Heart of a Dog

    Laurie Anderson circles death in this paean to her late dog, and other lost loves, that’s less free-associative than it initially seems, says Nick Pinkerton.


    Friday 20 May 2016

    Reviews and recommendations

  • Film of the week: Everybody Wants Some!!

    Film of the week: Everybody Wants Some!!

    Before adulthood (and before Reagan): Richard Linklater gets his rocks off with a rat pack of college freshmen on the road to self-definition, writes Pamela Hutchinson.


    Sunday 15 May 2016

    Reviews and recommendations

  • The invisible woman: film’s gender bias laid bare

    The invisible woman: film’s gender bias laid bare

    Three recent reports conclusively prove that female filmmakers are underrepresented across all sectors of the international industry, and urge institutional change to redress the balance. By Nikki Baughan.


    Wednesday 11 May 2016

    Comment

  • The psychological western

    The psychological western

    Born in the extrovert idealism of the frontier drama, the western was slow to adapt to the social malaise and anti-communist paranoia of the post-war period. Graham Fuller explains how it took its dark turn to incorporate contemporary socio-politics and psychology, with 12 case studies.


    Monday 9 May 2016

    Deep Focus

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