Top 10 most watched subscription films on BFI Player in 2018

The classics that cut through in 2018 – here are the year’s most popular subscription titles.

Subscription

Paris, Texas (1984)

Director Wim Wenders

Paris, Texas (1984)

The late, great Harry Dean Stanton’s finest role came as the near-mute Travis, on a journey across America to reunite his family, in Wim Wenders’ moving tale of loss and redemption.

Suspiria (1977)

Director Dario Argento

Suspiria (1977)

Dario Argento’s phantasmagoric gothic nightmare blends operatic violence, disorienting dream logic and hyper-real visuals to create a horror classic.

Betty Blue (1986)

Director Jean-Jacques Beineix

Betty Blue (1986)

Jean-Jacques Beineix’s story of a volatile, highly sexual relationship was one of the most successful French films of the 1980s.

Pauline at the Beach (1982)

Director Eric Rohmer

Pauline at the Beach (1983)

Eric Rohmer’s final collaboration with the great cinematographer Nestor Almendros follows a holidaying teenager as she begins to navigate the adult world.

Under the Skin (1997)

Director Carine Adler

Under the Skin (1997)

Carine Adler’s sexy and dark debut, starring Samantha Morton in her first major feature film role.

The Housemaid (2010)

Director Im Sang-soo

The Housemaid (2010)

An enigmatic housemaid and her wealthy, totalitarian employer begin an affair that will have disastrous consequences for them both.

Me Without You (2001)

Director Sandra Goldbacher

Me Without You (2001)

Anna Friel and Michelle Williams star as two troubled girls whose tumultuous friendship takes many twists and turns.

Listen Up Philip (2014)

Director Alex Ross Perry

Listen Up Philip (2014)

Jason Schwartzman is a hotshot writer with pathological intimacy problems in this caustic comedy of over-achievement.

8½ (1963)

Director Federico Fellini

Fellini triumphantly conjured himself out of writer’s block with this magnum opus about a film director experiencing his own creative crisis.

Room 237 (2012)

Director Rodney Ascher

Room 237 (2012)

Rodney Ascher’s enigmatic essay film weaves together the contrasting theories of five different narrators who believe Stanley Kubrick deliberately buried hidden messages in his 1980 adaptation of Stephen King’s novel.

Read more

Further reading

Back to the top

See something different

Subscribe now for exclusive offers and the best of cinema.
Hand-picked.