Features and reviews

Discover the latest from the BFI, the UK’s lead organisation for film, television and the moving image.

Where to begin

Where to begin with John Sayles

On his 70th birthday, we pick a beginner’s path through the work of a true maverick: the guiding light of American indie cinema, John Sayles.

By Matthew Thrift

Where to begin with John Sayles
Features

What to watch at LFF: Notturno, a vast Middle Eastern canvas from one of the world’s great documentary-makers

By Adrian Wootton

What to watch at LFF: Notturno, a vast Middle Eastern canvas from one of the world’s great documentary-makers
From the Sight & Sound archive

Notes from the cinematographer: Léonce-Henry Burel on working with Robert Bresson

By Tom Milne

Notes from the cinematographer: Léonce-Henry Burel on working with Robert Bresson
Features

La dolce vita: Unlocking the images in Fellini’s visual feast

By Leigh Singer

La dolce vita: Unlocking the images in Fellini’s visual feast
Features

What to watch at LFF: Mads Mikkelsen drinks and dances in Another Round

By Sarah Lutton

What to watch at LFF: Mads Mikkelsen drinks and dances in Another Round
From the Sight & Sound archive

Erich Von Stroheim in London

By Karel Reisz

Erich Von Stroheim in London
Where to begin

Where to begin with Kiyoshi Kurosawa

By Sonali Joshi

Where to begin with Kiyoshi Kurosawa
Features

Il Cinema Ritrovato 2020: keeping film alive against all odds

By Philip Concannon

Il Cinema Ritrovato 2020: keeping film alive against all odds
Features

What to watch at LFF: New extreme cinema

By Paul Ridd

What to watch at LFF: New extreme cinema
Features

Why do we treat serial killers’ gay victims as dramatically disposable?

By Alex Davidson

Why do we treat serial killers’ gay victims as dramatically disposable?
Features

The punks that took on prejudice: White Riot and the 1970s Rock Against Racism movement

By Stephanie Phillips

The punks that took on prejudice: White Riot and the 1970s Rock Against Racism movement
Features

What to watch at LFF: How 3 pioneering Australian sisters made a silent gem

By Bryony Dixon

What to watch at LFF: How 3 pioneering Australian sisters made a silent gem
Features

Maborosi at 25: The enigmatic calm of Hirokazu Koreeda’s debut

By Serena Scateni

Maborosi at 25: The enigmatic calm of Hirokazu Koreeda’s debut
Features

“We gave them too much power”: how Rocks became a gem by giving its young cast license to shine

By Simran Hans

“We gave them too much power”: how Rocks became a gem by giving its young cast license to shine
Where to begin

Where to begin with Naomi Kawase

By Hayley Scanlon

Where to begin with Naomi Kawase
Features

What to watch at LFF: How Shadow Country sounds a warning from history

By Peter Hames

What to watch at LFF: How Shadow Country sounds a warning from history
Features

The Painted Bird and the cinema of Eastern Europe’s WWII bloodlands

By Michael Brooke

The Painted Bird and the cinema of Eastern Europe’s WWII bloodlands
Features

What to watch at LFF: Never Gonna Snow Again, Malgorzata Szumowska’s enigmatic social satire

By Geoff Andrew

What to watch at LFF: Never Gonna Snow Again, Malgorzata Szumowska’s enigmatic social satire
Features

The sound and the fury: rap, reggae and resistance in La Haine

By Steph Green

The sound and the fury: rap, reggae and resistance in La Haine
Where to begin

Where to begin with Sally Potter

By So Mayer

Where to begin with Sally Potter
From the Sight & Sound archive

Kenneth Tynan on Greta Garbo: “The ecstasy of existing”

By Kenneth Tynan

Kenneth Tynan on Greta Garbo: “The ecstasy of existing”
Features

How La Haine redefined rebellion on screen

By Kaleem Aftab

How La Haine redefined rebellion on screen
Features

Franco Piavoli’s odes to Earth

By Ross McDonnell

Franco Piavoli’s odes to Earth
Features

Clint’s best shot: White Hunter Black Heart and Eastwood’s biggest performance

By Brogan Morris

Clint’s best shot: White Hunter Black Heart and Eastwood’s biggest performance
Features

Non-linear Nolan

By James Mottram

Non-linear Nolan
Features

Inclusive utopias – old and new visions of disability on screen

By Graham Findlay

Inclusive utopias – old and new visions of disability on screen
Features

70 years of Rashomon – A new look at Akira Kurosawa’s cinematic milestone of post-truth

By Jasper Sharp

70 years of Rashomon – A new look at Akira Kurosawa’s cinematic milestone of post-truth
Features

Black voices in silent cinema

By Pamela Hutchinson

Black voices in silent cinema
Features

A survivor’s take on I May Destroy You

By Winnie M Li

A survivor’s take on I May Destroy You
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