All Sight and Sound articles

Reviews

Four Daughters: the facts and fictions of a Tunisian family’s history blur in this fascinating hybrid documentary

Kaouther Ben Hania’s docudrama sees a mix of actors and real members of a Tunisian family reenact painful events that preceded two elder daughters leaving to join ISIS.

By Jonathan Romney

Four Daughters: the facts and fictions of a Tunisian family’s history blur in this fascinating hybrid documentary
From the Sight and Sound archive

“It is about moments of connecting and not connecting”: Kelly Reichardt on Certain Women

By So Mayer

“It is about moments of connecting and not connecting”: Kelly Reichardt on Certain Women
Festivals

Black Tea: a labyrinthine multicultural love story

By Nick James

Black Tea: a labyrinthine multicultural love story
Festivals

Abiding Nowhere: a beautiful addition to Tsai Ming-liang’s Walker film series

By Nick James

Abiding Nowhere: a beautiful addition to Tsai Ming-liang’s Walker film series
Festivals

Pepe: Pablo Escobar’s philosophical hippo takes viewers on a radically inventive journey

By Jonathan Romney

Pepe: Pablo Escobar’s philosophical hippo takes viewers on a radically inventive journey
Festivals

Architecton: a daunting look at the rubble of our existence

By Nicolas Rapold

Architecton: a daunting look at the rubble of our existence
Festivals

Spaceman: Adam Sandler and an alien spider embark on a mission to Jupiter in this dull sci-fi

By Jessica Kiang

Spaceman: Adam Sandler and an alien spider embark on a mission to Jupiter in this dull sci-fi
Festivals

Dahomey: Mati Diop’s otherworldly documentary gives voice to looted African artefacts

By Rachel Pronger

Dahomey: Mati Diop’s otherworldly documentary gives voice to looted African artefacts
Festivals

Small Things like These: this grimy, moving portrait of 1980s Ireland knows the power of restraint

By Jessica Kiang

Small Things like These: this grimy, moving portrait of 1980s Ireland knows the power of restraint
Reviews

Perfect Days: Wim Wenders captures the beauty of the everyday in his best fiction film since Wings of Desire

By Nick James

Perfect Days: Wim Wenders captures the beauty of the everyday in his best fiction film since Wings of Desire
Reviews

Out Of Darkness: a brutal, horrifying entry in the canon of prehistory on screen

By Kim Newman

Out Of Darkness: a brutal, horrifying entry in the canon of prehistory on screen
From the Sight and Sound archive

City of God: angels with dirty faces

By Ismail Xavier

City of God: angels with dirty faces
Reviews

Memory: early-onset dementia and past traumas complicate a new relationship in Michel Franco’s warmest film to date

By Alex Ramon

Memory: early-onset dementia and past traumas complicate a new relationship in Michel Franco’s warmest film to date
Reviews

This is Me…Now: A Love Story: a musical extravaganza fuelled by fairytales, metaphors, and obsessions

By Elena Lazic

This is Me…Now: A Love Story: a musical extravaganza fuelled by fairytales, metaphors, and obsessions
Interviews

“Why does a guy like me dream about making a western?”: Lisandro Alonso on Eureka

By Arjun Sajip

“Why does a guy like me dream about making a western?”: Lisandro Alonso on Eureka
Reviews

River: a two-minute time loop traps a group of hospitality workers in this breezy Japanese sci-fi

By Josh Slater-Williams

River: a two-minute time loop traps a group of hospitality workers in this breezy Japanese sci-fi
Reviews

Madame Web: an unnecessary but lightly likeable addition to the Spider-verse

By Kim Newman

Madame Web: an unnecessary but lightly likeable addition to the Spider-verse
Reviews

Someone’s Daughter, Someone’s Son: a clear-eyed look at the issue of homelessness

By Philip Concannon

Someone’s Daughter, Someone’s Son: a clear-eyed look at the issue of homelessness
Interviews

“The scale of any project is secondary – it’s always about the quality of the writing”: Cillian Murphy on Small Things like These

By Sinéad Gleeson

“The scale of any project is secondary – it’s always about the quality of the writing”: Cillian Murphy on Small Things like These
Interviews

Christopher Nolan: a showman’s odyssey

By James Bell

Christopher Nolan: a showman’s odyssey
Reviews

The Promised Land: potato farming turns bloody in this bold 18th-century Danish epic

By Adam Nayman

The Promised Land: potato farming turns bloody in this bold 18th-century Danish epic
Reviews

Eureka: Lisandro Alonso’s shape-shifting, decolonised western puts Indigenous stories front and centre

By Tom Charity

Eureka: Lisandro Alonso’s shape-shifting, decolonised western puts Indigenous stories front and centre
Reviews

Your Fat Friend: Aubrey Gordon explores the impact of anti-fat bias in this empathetic documentary

By Katie McCabe

Your Fat Friend: Aubrey Gordon explores the impact of anti-fat bias in this empathetic documentary
From the Sight and Sound archive

Out of oblivion: Alice Guy-Blaché

By Francis Lacassin

Out of oblivion: Alice Guy-Blaché
Reviews

The Taste of Things: Tran Anh Hung’s elegant gastro film is a feast for the senses

By Catherine Wheatley

The Taste of Things: Tran Anh Hung’s elegant gastro film is a feast for the senses
From the Sight and Sound archive

Giddy adventures, gender skirmishes and aural seductions: Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night

By Kate Stables

Giddy adventures, gender skirmishes and aural seductions: Frank Capra’s It Happened One Night
Features

Lost and found: Ping Pong

By George White

Lost and found: Ping Pong
Festivals

The Ballad of Suzanne Césaire: this poignant anti-biopic resists conventional ideas around rediscovery

By Rachel Pronger

The Ballad of Suzanne Césaire: this poignant anti-biopic resists conventional ideas around rediscovery
Festivals

Rei: grace is extended to every character in this beautiful meditation on loneliness

By John Bleasdale

Rei: grace is extended to every character in this beautiful meditation on loneliness
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